Efffects of dating abuse and teens


Dating violence is a pattern of verbal, physical, sexual or emotional violence against a romantic partner.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), each year about one in 11 teens report being a victim of physical abuse – and one in five teens report being a victim of emotional abuse.Lead author Michele Ybarra, a researcher with the Center for Innovative Public Health Research in San Clemente, Calif., said in an e-mail that she could not discuss the study because it is under review for publication in a scientific journal.In general, data presented at a conference are not considered as authoritative as results reviewed by outside experts and then published.The 24-hour service is available at at 1-866-331-9474, or by texting "loveis" to 22522.In this 2010 photo North Plainfield High School drama students Luis Salazar, right, as "C.



Emotional abuse includes behaviors such as name calling, threatening, insulting, shaming, manipulating, criticizing, controlling access to friends and family, expecting a partner to check in constantly, and using technology like texting to control and batter.A study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that 75 percent of seventh graders report having a boyfriend or girlfriend.For some young people, these are healthy and loving relationships that offer excellent opportunities to explore their beliefs and values about relationships.The survey findings stand in stark contrast to one other set of statistics: In 2012, 94% of abuse victims who contacted the National Dating Abuse Helpline were female and just 6% were male, says Katie Ray Jones, president of the dating abuse helpline and the National Domestic Abuse Hotline.

The dating line, which offers 24-hour help by online chat (at loveisrespect.org), text (text "loveis" to 22522) or phone (1-866-331-9474), is aimed at young people of both genders.

One big question: Are boys and girls really equally at risk to become victims or abusers?